Recruiting

The success of any volunteer program depends on securing the right individuals and securing enough of them to meet the requests from teachers. The following suggestions will help your recruitment efforts:

1. Ask the ones you already know. The best recruiters for volunteering will be folks who have already experienced the reward and excitement of working in a school or other organization. The first individuals to be contacted should be those who are already volunteering. Ask your present volunteers to talk to their friends about serving as Grandees.

2.  Promotion. A simple but attractive promotional flyer or a single sheet handout can be developed. Make sure that all handouts contain the name and phone number of a contact person.  This can appear at sports events, carnivals, and at the office counter.  Beyond hard copy, make sure there is a way to respond to a call for volunteers on the school website or social media.

3. Conduct a parent/volunteer survey. If you are starting your program at the beginning of the year, consider asking all parents, at the time of registration or enrollment, to complete a volunteer survey form. The form should list all areas of involvement in the school.  It should ask for the names of other people who might be interested in giving a talk, sharing expertise, or donating items.  Those people may well become short-term or long-term volunteers.  A sign-up table at registration staffed by an enthusiastic Grandee will help parents realize the possibilites for the Grandee program.

4. Plan a letter-writing campaign. Send a special letter to grandparents, uncles and aunts within driving distance of the school. Retired teachers, business and professional people who want to “give back” or be more involved in the community, and people hoping to land jobs with your organization are good possibilities for Grandees.

5. Speak to groups. A presentation to AARP and RSVP groups may discover a wealth of volunteers. Often, even though the group presentation may be effective, volunteers may be reluctant to offer themselves and re-enter “school.” They must be sought out as individuals and encouraged to use their skills to work with the students.

6. Be in the news. Ask a local newspaper to write a feature story about your Grandee program. Look for occasions such as Grandparents’ Day, National History Month, or slow news days when reporters need content.  Consider websites, too.

Here’s what some people have said about volunteering as Grandees:

“I am as enthusiastic about the Grandee Program as the children and teachers. My scrapbook of love notes from the children is full and running over. I am happy to begin another one. the love and relationship with the children is great.”
— Gene Rains
“How wonderful it is to be so wanted by the children. They greet me with honor and love. the teachers are very cooperative and are willing to assist us in anyway we ask. The children tell me of their appreciation and care in many ways. Usually I give them a riddle pertaining to their story at the beginning of the session and ask for the answer at the end. they can’t wait to ask me the answer their own riddle or joke. They frequently come prepared for our Grandee session with a book of jokes or story about their friends or family they want to share. the younger children lovingly make up knock-knock jokes and frequently their answers are saying “I Love You!” I am happy to say that working as a team with the other Grandees, teachers and staff is very fulfilling and rewarding. One gets to know and become friends with so many fine people. I consider this a blessing.”
— Naomi Underwood
“Being a Grandee gives each of us warm fuzzies. It is warm and comfortable relationships. We share together.”
— Jean Duncan
“My experience as a Grandee brings light into each of our lives. the children and teachers and I grow from sharing stories and friendships.”
— Merle Christ
“Grandma Gene has been such a blessing. I appreciate the time she has taken to come and share her love and stories with the children.”
— Sharon Daniel (5th grade teacher)
“Grandees are a wonderful addition to a class. They help fill the void that may be there due to the absence of a parent or grandparent.”
— Sharon Fierst, teacher

“I am as enthusiastic about the Grandee Program as the children and teachers. My scrapbook of love notes from the children is full and running over. I am happy to begin another one. the love and relationship with the children is great.”— Gene Rains”How wonderful it is to be so wanted by the children. They greet me with honor and love. the teachers are very cooperative and are willing to assist us in anyway we ask. The children tell me of their appreciation and care in many ways. Usually I give them a riddle pertaining to their story at the beginning of the session and ask for the answer at the end. they can’t wait to ask me the answer their own riddle or joke. They frequently come prepared for our Grandee session with a book of jokes or story about their friends or family they want to share. the younger children lovingly make up knock-knock jokes and frequently their answers are saying “I Love You!” I am happy to say that working as a team with the other Grandees, teachers and staff is very fulfilling and rewarding. One gets to know and become friends with so many fine people. I consider this a blessing.”— Naomi Underwood”Being a Grandee gives each of us warm fuzzies. It is warm and comfortable relationships. We share together.”— Jean Duncan”My experience as a GranDee brings light into each of our lives. the children and teachers and I grow from sharing stories and friendships.”— Merle Christ”Grandma Gene has been such a blessing. I appreciate the time she has taken to come and share her love and stories with the children.”— Sharon Daniel (5th grade teacher)”GranDees are a wonderful addition to a class. They help fill the void that may be there due to the absence of a parent or grandparent.”— Sharon Fierst, teacher